Social Media Manager vs. Online Community Manager: Same or Different?

Source: Vanessa DiMauro

Slide1One recent morning I saw a post in one of my LinkedIN groups asking “what is the difference between a social media manager and an online community manager?” Easy, I thought, and offered a quick response on my mobile … “Social media managers bring the guests (clients, prospects) to the table and community managers welcome them in!”

Ahh, but wait. This may require more words than I can manage on that little screen. So, naturally, I turned to trusty Google to see what others have said on this topic. Among the first mentions I came across was a CMSWire which discussed the confusion between social media and online community management, and suggested the two roles have become blurred.

In my view, the confusion often begins with job descriptions, which are rarely written by actual practitioners. For larger organizations new to these rapidly evolving specialties, they strive to find and describe the commonalities rather than highlight the differences in the two roles.
Next, I sought out my trusted peers and colleagues to see and hear what they had to say. In a post by the very knowledgeable Blaise Grimes-Viort from the UK firm e-Moderation, he shared the following definitions of these two roles:

· Community Manager: Operates from deep within the company, managing customer relationships with a brand or product, and each other. Potentially she can be a fully Enterprise Community Manager, involved in facilitating efficient inter-team and staff communication and collaboration. She is focussed on the flow of information and knowledge, strengthening relationships and promoting productive collaboration, which may include moderation and hosting of both micro- and macro-events on the company’s community platform. Placement within the Organization chart is more likely to be connected to Editorial, Product development, Business development, and Marketing. In addition, I would add Customer Service/Support to the list of org chart nodes above.

· Social Media Manager: Operates from the edges of the company, managing brand recognition and reputation outside of the scope of the brand website. He is focused on listening and evaluating brand perception, planning campaigns and promotional material or initiatives to promote the company’s message, building and leveraging social networks on social platforms such as Twitter and Facebook to facilitate depth of communication. He will usually be found within the Organisation chart connected to Marketing, PR, and Sales.

Another aspect of the blurring and overlap in roles is the type of organization doing the hiring — what is the business focus for the role? Business-to-business (B2B) and consumer companies have very different requirements. In consumer organizations, the community focus is individual consumers, and consumers generally frequent public social media channels with broad reach and large numbers. On the other hand, B2B organizations focus on building customer intimacy using channels such as online communities, customer councils and executive briefing centers along with offline outreach. For B2B, the desired relationship is deeper, just as the purchase cycle may be longer, revenue potential much greater and the depth of engagement (think suppliers and partners as well as customers) may be much greater and more complicated. In B2B organizations the social media manager is part of marketing and PR, facing outward for the most part. The B2B community manager has some outward responsibilities, but is connected to more core operations at the firm.

These distinctions are especially visible in the success measures for each role – the key performance indicators. Of course, both roles may share responsibility for a number success metrics and will need to partner effectively to deliver results. Here is a short tabulation of key B2B success measures, the role involved and the organizational accountability path.

B2B Success Measure Role Accountability
Drive leads Social Media Manager Marketing
Raise awareness of products or services Social Media Manager Marketing
Visibility of company, products, services or thought leaders Social Media Manager Marketing
Increase sales Social Media Manager Sales
Event attendance Social Media Manager on public channels, Community manager on community channels Marketing
Customer questions about how to use a product or service Community Manager Customer Service
Learn from customers (e.g. feedback into product development) Community Manager Product Management/R&D
Customer retention / satisfaction Community Manager Sales
Call center reduction/ Improve customers’ ability to get help from each other Community Manager Customer Service
Increase utilization of the products Community Manager Product Management

Note that in the B2B world, where customers tend to be other organizations purchasing complex and expensive products and services, the lines between the social media manager and the community manager roles can be more clearly defined than in consumer space. B2B and consumer prospects have very different information and relationship needs, and when the sale is made the customers require very different levels of ongoing engagement and support. The overlap between the B2B social media and online community manager roles is usually much less than for those roles at a B2C firm.

“Managing Online Risk: Apps, Mobile, and Social Media Security” Book Released Featuring Stephen Fells

Deborah Gonzalez

Deborah Gonzalez

Managing Online Risk: Apps, Mobile, and Social Media Security“, authored by Deborah Gonzalez, is a definitive resource that provides an overview of the risk mitigation strategies, solutions and best practices to address liability and security concerns arising from corporate online and digital activity.

The book, based on content aggregation, seeks out and integrates the most recent and best information available. Chapter 3, “Reputation and Identity” includes an interview with Follr CEO Stephen Fells.

The book presents readers with tools and resources to better understand the security and reputational risks of online and digital activity, as well as information on how to mitigate those risks and minimize potential loss. The tools and resources include case studies; industry and expert profiles; lessons learned; overview of relevant laws, regulations, and professional guidelines by industry; sample policies, disclaimers and online community guidelines; and more.

In addition the book has a companion Website (www.mangingonlinerisk.com) that offers the latest updates and resources.

managing-online-risk-book-cover

The book contains ten chapters focusing on security and risk management concern in the digital and online environment. The chapters are:

Chapter 1: Risk Management Digital Style
Chapter 2: Internal and External Risks
Chapter 3: Reputation and Identity
Chapter 4: The New Workforce
Chapter 5: Big Data
Chapter 6: Approaches to Content
Chapter 7: Compliance
Chapter 8: Currency and Campaigns
Chapter 9: Digital Succession
Chapter 10: The Future of Online Security

To purchase the book visit Amazon.com.

Premium Seats at Premium Events = Premium Prices

When Super Bowl LI kicks off on Sunday, only a small fraction of those who are going to be watching will be so lucky as to be inside the NRG Stadium in Houston. With secondary market ticket prices starting at around $2,000, attending the game is not exactly a cheap affair. But make no mistake, it doesn’t take the secondary market to spend this kind of money to attend a sporting event.

As our chart illustrates, premium tickets for premium sporting events easily break an average fan’s annual ticket budget. According to Statista’s Digital Market Outlook, an average attendee of sporting events in the United States, one who ordered at least one ticket online, spent an average of $224 on online ticket purchases in 2016.

To find out more about the growing online ticketing, please refer to our complimentary market report “eServices: Event Tickets”.

This chart compares ticket prices for major sporting events to an average fan’s annual budget for online ticket purchases.

Infographic: Premium Seats at Premium Events = Premium Prices | Statista
You will find more statistics at Statista

Six Nations Championship Guide – 2017 Infographic

Source: Graphic News

The Six Nations Championship, the northern hemisphere’s premier rugby union tournament, gets underway. Reigning Grand Slam champions England will begin their campaign against France at Twickenham, hoping to continue their remarkable 13-match unbeaten streak of 2016. Elsewhere, opening weekend fixtures will see Scotland clash with Ireland at Murrayfield, and Italy take on Wales at the Stadio Olimpico.

Six Nations Rugby 2017 Infographic

Follr Feature – Professional and Personal Tags

The ‘Follr Tag’ feature allows you to not only describe yourself personally and professional but also to search and connect with a far broader range of people using very specific criteria.

Having logged into your account simply click on ‘Connections’ and then ‘Finder’:

Follr Digital Identity

Your search results are only as good as the quality of tags entered so make sure that for your own account and profile Website you enter as much information as possible and choose your tags (professional and personal) thoughtfully; this is also how others will find you.

Have questions we didn’t answer?  Want to know more? Ask us!

Why Americans Love the Super Bowl

With all the hype surrounding the Super Bowl, it’s easy to forget that in the end, it is still a sporting event. However, if it weren’t for the spectacular halftime show, the parties and the special commercials airing during the broadcast, the Super Bowl probably wouldn’t be the global event it has become over the years.

Consequently, it doesn’t necessarily come as a surprise that not even 6 in 10 Americans say that the actual game is their favorite thing about the Super Bowl. That is according to Statista’s 2017 Super Bowl Survey, which found that the commercials are Americans’ second favorite thing about the whole Super Bowl experience.

This chart shows what Americans love most about the Super Bowl.

Infographic: Why Americans Love the Super Bowl | Statista
You will find more statistics at Statista

Follr Rewards Feature: Monetize Your Community Management Efforts

You can generate revenue through your Follr online community in many ways. Sell event tickets, offer paid subscriptions to access exclusive content, and even earn money by inviting others to do the same. With Follr Rewards, monetizing your online community efforts is easy as A-B-C. You can also easily track your rewards right from your Rewards Program Dashboard:

Follr Rewards Program

Follr Guide to Rewards:

1. Share Your Link

Grow your network, save your friends money and earn Follr Dollars you can use for upgrades and add-ons.

2. Friends Join Follr

Earn Follr Score points for every signup from your link. Your friends receive amazing savings thanks to you! Earn 1 point for each registration, 2 points if you are a Pro member.

3. Friend Upgrades

If anyone you invited upgrades, you earn Follr Dollars you can use to upgrade to Pro or to buy an add-on domain name. Earn $2 Follr Dollars for each registration, $5 Follr Dollars if you are a Pro member. It’s that simple. Create your own Follr Community today and get earning!