Why Americans Love the Super Bowl

With all the hype surrounding the Super Bowl, it’s easy to forget that in the end, it is still a sporting event. However, if it weren’t for the spectacular halftime show, the parties and the special commercials airing during the broadcast, the Super Bowl probably wouldn’t be the global event it has become over the years.

Consequently, it doesn’t necessarily come as a surprise that not even 6 in 10 Americans say that the actual game is their favorite thing about the Super Bowl. That is according to Statista’s 2017 Super Bowl Survey, which found that the commercials are Americans’ second favorite thing about the whole Super Bowl experience.

This chart shows what Americans love most about the Super Bowl.

Infographic: Why Americans Love the Super Bowl | Statista
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Will Super Bowl LI Set a New TV Audience Record?

Following the epic Australian Open finals this weekend, the next major sporting event is just around the corner to offer some welcome distraction from what else is happening in the world. When Super Bowl LI kicks off on Sunday, hundreds of millions of people around globe will be watching, enjoying the game, the show and everything that comes with it.

In the United States, Super Bowl TV viewership has risen sharply since the 1990s. For the past few years, it has been hovering around 110 million with the 2015 game setting an all-time U.S. television record at 114.4 million viewers. After a slight decline in viewership last year, this year’s Super Bowl is likely to beat the 2016 game, but can it break the record for the most-viewed TV program of all time?

Regardless of whether 110 or 115 million people will tune in, it’s numbers like these that explain why brands are willing to pay millions to advertise during the broadcast. After all, which company wouldn’t want its brand to be present at the biggest TV event of the year?

This chart shows how many people in the United States tune in to the Super Bowl every year.

Infographic: Will Super Bowl LI Set a New TV Audience Record? | Statista
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Super Bowl Ad Prices Doubled in a Decade

When Super Bowl LI kicks off on February 5, the NFL championship won’t be the only title that’s on the line. With more than a hundred million viewers glued to the TV in the U.S. alone, marketers and advertisers will compete for the unofficial title “Most Memorable Super Bowl Spot”.

Since 2007, the average rate for a 30-second spot during the Super Bowl broadcast has risen from $2.4 million to $4.8 million, making it by far the most expensive time slot U.S. television has to offer – a 30-second spot during the Academy Award ceremony is less than half the price. It’s a price that brands are willing to pay though. Last year, Super Bowl TV ad spend in the U.S. amounted to $445 million when including pre- and post-game programming. According to Kantar Media that is roughly equivalent to the combined ad revenue of the four major broadcast networks in an average week.

In return for their investment, advertisers not only get a huge audience (111.9 million viewers in 2016) but an audience that sticks around: during the 2013 Super Bowl, only 0.7 percent of the audience tuned away during commercial breaks. The average tuneaway rate during regular TV programming is five times as high. Consumers tend to pay special attention to Super Bowl ads, as agencies typically try to honour the prestigious occasion with especially witty and often funny ads.

This chart shows TV ad rates during the TV broadcast of the Super Bowl in the United States from 2007 to 2016.

Infographic: Super Bowl Ad Prices Doubled in a Decade | Statista
You will find more statistics at Statista

NFL Hall Of Famers: Down The Coaching Drain

With an eye to the concept of ‘brain drain’, the chart below looks at how many active Hall of Fame coaches there have been in the NFL from 1985 to 2015. The number has reduced over the years from six in 1985 to just one (future) Hall of Famer in 2015 – Bill Belichick. The infographic also shows the ‘best of the rest’ for each year as assessed by Greg Bedard of Sports Illustrated.

The full feature on this graphic can be read on Sports Illustrated.

This chart shows the number of Hall of Fame coaches there were active in the NFL from 1985 to 2015.

Infographic: Hall Of Famers: Down The Coaching Drain | Statista
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NFL Edges Towards A Full House In London

Since 2013, the NFL has played at least two games per season across the pond in London. The 90,000 capacity Wembley Stadium has played host to the likes of the Miami Dolphins, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Dallas Cowboys in front of thousands of spectators there to get a taste of the live American football experience.

Attendance figures for these International Series games have been strong and are rising gradually. Over the three games in 2015 the average turnout in London was 83,877 and the most recent game was also sold out.

This chart shows the average attendance of NFL games in Wembley Stadium, London from 2013 to 2015.

Infographic: NFL Edges Towards A Full House In London | Statista
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